film

Lomo does mail order

In its unending battle to convince the world the future is analogue Lomography has made film processing more convenient by offering a mail order service.

At this stage the mail-in option is only open to residents of the UK but it’s not hard to imagine the global-minded community eventually extending the postal service internationally.

Only a couple of months old, the LomoLab opened its East London doors in March offering on-site processing, scanning and printing of every 120mm or 35mm film type available.

The new mail service allows customers to order special Lomo mailers into which they deposit film to be sent to the lab for processing and have the completed photos returned with all the haste the British postal service can muster.

The company says all its lab operators are photography graduates with years of professional printing experience.

“Each set of prints will be treated with care and consideration and will be handled as though they belonged to the LabRats themselves!

“No rushed and uncared-for, one-hour processing here – no siree bob!”

While the company might talk a good anti-digital game, Lomography is actually rather plugged in – ahead of the postie, all mail-in images are also made available to download for 60 days after processing.

The digital photos can also be transferred to a user’s online LomoHome account and shared with the online analogue community.

Leica posts big sales bump

It has been a good fiscal year for Leica, with the company reporting an increase in sales of over 50 percent for 2010/2011.

From April 1 2010 to March 31 2011 Leica Camera AG saw a 57.3 percent increase in sales compared to the previous year, going from €158.2 million to €248.9 million.

The company’s pre-tax earnings improved six-fold on the previous year from €7.4 million to €42.4 million and net income went from €3.2 million to €30.4 million.

Leica attributes the success to ongoing popularity of products from the Leica M system, professional S series and the company’s casual compact range.

The record sales figures mean that the manufacturer will be paying a €0.3 dividend per share to stockholders, a payout totaling €5.0 million and the first time Leica has been able to pay a dividend since 1997.

It is certainly a reversal of fortunes for a company that suffered heavily for its stubborn support of film photography as the rest of the industry raced into the digital era.

Decaying in style

Many people decry the sate of camera manufacturing these days, complaining quality components have gone out the window and things just aren’t built to last.

This is a concept that designer Remy Labesque has embraced, examinging the way in which certain devices can be ‘aged to perfection’ whereas others just start to look bad.

On the Object Oriented blog Labesque breaks down the aesthetic crumbling of two devices not long for this world – a broken iPhone and old Canon compact film camera.

When it comes down to inner workings he gives the analogue Canon its dues, after seven years it’s still working fine, the only reason it is being dumped is because it’s not digital.

The iPhone on the other hand is only three years old and is getting the boot because its touch screen no longer works – the curmudgeonly quality argument seems to have scored a point.

However, when Labesque turns a visual design eye to the well-worn devices the new phone tops the old camera in terms of wearing in over time.

“After 3+ years of having been carried in the same pocket as a ring of keys, the iPhone has acquired a polished patina over its aluminum shell,” he says.

“Abrasion of its hard-anodized surface has revealed the raw aluminum within.”

The Canon’s battle damage, though, simply serves to reflect the cheap black plastic construction hidden behind a silver façade.

“The camera’s emulated metallic finish is only surface-deep and its wear tends to emphasizes awkward artifacts of the injection molding process used to create it.

“At this point the Canon camera’s shell looks like garbage while the iPhone’s is starting to resemble something more like an heirloom pocket watch.”

The designer cites the Japanese concept Wabi-sabi, the aesthetically pleasing wear of an object as it decays over time, as he suggests cameras and other devices should have a greater emphasis on ‘aging with dignity’.

 

New photojournalism film trailer

A new trailer for an independent film dramatising a group of photojournalists’ work in South Africa during the Apartheid period has hit the net.

Due to be released next month, The Bang Bang Club follows four young combat photographers who banded together to document the brutal violence and oppression surrounding the first free elections post-Apartheid in 1994.

Kevin Carter, Ken Oosterbroek, Greg Marinovich and Joao Silva comprised the eponymous club and the film is based on a book of the same name written by the later two.

Written and directed by documentary filmmaker Steven Silver the film stars Ryan Phillippe, Taylor Kitsch, Neels Van Jaarsveld and Frank Rautenbach.

You can view the iTunes-exclusive trailer here; the film is due to open in the US on April 22.

It looks like the film will tackle some of the heavier ethical dilemmas involved in photojournalism (the kind that contributed to Carter’s suicide in 1994), hopefully the feature does the weighty material justice.

 

Polaroid Back From the Grave

Amateur and professional photographers worldwide have cause for celebration
— Polaroid is officially back. To mark this momentous occasion, Polaroid have
launched a new model, the Polaroid 300, which is now available in New Zealand.

True to type, the Polaroid 300 uses instant film, has an automatic flash, and
features four scene settings. Ten-packs of Polaroid 300 film will also be on sale.

John Rule, National Sales and Marketing Manager for Polaroid at Hagemeyer
Brands Australia, commented, “We are excited that Polaroid is bringing back instant
photography for amateur and professional photographers alike, and we are ecstatic
that we are inspiring a new generation with the magic of instant.”

Lady Gaga (Stefani Germanotta) is currently the Creative Director for the Polaroid
Brand, and is said to be developing new co-branded Polaroid products. Polaroid is
also partnering with global leaders in imaging technologies, such as ZINK Imaging,
with plans to market a full range of instant digital products utilising ZINK® Zero
Ink® Printing Technology.

The Polaroid 300 comes in red, black and blue, and will be available in New Zealand
for $199. The ten-packs of film will retail for $29.95.

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House Finale Shot on 5D

The season finale of House has become the first US prime-time television show entirely filmed on a dSLR, the Canon 5D Mark II.

According to PetaPixel, the show’s director Greg Yaitanes, chose the HD capabilities on the stills camera to achieve “richer. shallow focus pulls the actors faces to forground [sic],” and because of its ability to be used in tight spaces.

Yaitanes didn’t use any special kit to film the House finale either, employing only the series of Canon prime lenses, the 24-70mm and the 70-200mm to shoot 22mins of film to CF cards at a time.

Paparazzi Documentary Premiers

A new film about the ˜King of Paparazzi,’ Ron Galela, is premiering at the Sundance Film Festival, offering a sympathetic portrait of the photographer who was punched by Marlon Brando, beat down by Richard Burton’s bodyguards and sued by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

According to AFP, it’s hard to dislike the photographer after watching the movie directed by the Oscar-winning filmmaker, Leon Gast, which ˜reveals a man with a wicked sense of humor and over-sized ego, who fills the garden of his New Jersey home with artificial plants and rabbits who keep him company,’ and also took to wearing a football helmet when following Brando.

Smash His Camera premieres at Sundance Film Festival, which is playing in Utah, USA now.

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