Christina Force

Image Nation 2014: Day Two

Kelly Lynch continues her report on this year’s Image Nation conference, with day two’s speaker line-up

The second day of the 2014 Image Nation conference proved just as diverse and inspiring as the first (covered here). The Advertisers and Illustrative Photographer’s Association outdid itself with this year’s installment of the annual convention. The following is a brief recap of day two’s presentations.

 

Anita Totha

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Totha shares her experience of New York life while attending the School of Visual Arts, working as an intern for contemporary photographers like Simen Johan and Steven Shore as well as working at the Yossi Milo gallery.

Arriving in New Zealand three years ago and loving the stark, contrasting light, she began to produce her own bodies of work, becoming a photographer in her own right. Embracing Auckland’s photographic community, she has gone on to co-found Tangent, a small group of photographers who meet bi-monthly to review work.  As part of this year’s Auckland Festival of Photography, each member of the collective captured a different section of Great South Road.  Totha is also part of the local chapter of the worldwide Photo Book Club network that meets bi-monthly discussing photo books.

Top tip: if you want to exhibit in galleries get your work seen in photography and art magazines

 

Emma Bass

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Bass takes us on a journey of her life through photography. After a time in London and a career in nursing she attended Carrington Polytech, where she explored the process of layering images in art projects. This technique of overlaying shapes, textures, and colours has emerged at different stages of her career, including shots in a junk yard, on human bodies, and later, in her project Bloom, with flowers, rocks, and leaves over-layered onto images of pregnant women.

She injects fun into her editorial shoots capturing celebrities, interiors, and weddings. “I like to bring out the strength of women when photographing,” she remarks.

Bass is currently exhibiting work from her Imperfectproject humble flowers and plants with failings, lit and composed simply yet, in true Emma Bass style, elegantly.

Top tip: if you have an idea, act on it right away

 

Christina Force

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Force’s passion is to help photographers tap into the things they care about and reach their potential. An industry expert, she knows what works, making her hugely effective in her role as a photo/folio consultant. “Be unique, this will attract the attention from the right people,” she advises.

 

Her session gave insight into how to make your photographs successful and get seen, as well as being honest about what you’re about. “You always make money from something you love rather than what other people want you to do… ask, ‘Why you want to be a photographer, what is your purpose?’ The same questions corporations are asking themselves these days and will ask you.”

Top tip: if your target market is on social media, you need to be too

 

Mark Watson

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An extreme adventure photographer, Watson wowed with his opening presentation of fast moving action stills of skiers, freestyle motocross riders, and surfers, shot dynamically with high or slow shutter, panning, and sequence shots. In addition to shooting product on athletes in the extreme, he does a lot of work for Red Bull and his editorial work appears in magazines like Australian Geographic.

He finds himself using a lot more flash lighting these days. He has built strong relationships, puts in lots of research and has in-depth knowledge of his gear,  and uses this experience to deliver not only what the client wants, but something more as well.

Top tip: always do a recce of a place before shooting there, if possible

 

Simon Harsent

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English-born fine art and commercial photographer Harsent works between New York and Australia, and anywhere else when possible. Winning a truckload of awards, he previously ran two studios simultaneously, worked seven days a week, 14 hours a day.  He says people often see success as money, but for him it’s about pleasing himself when photographing.

It is his collection of gritty personal work that has defined him: Melt: Portrait of an Iceberg,  bergs shot from water level, tactile, appearing as sculptures; The Beautiful Game, the irony of football; GBH, large black-and-white portraits of big-time football hooligans who’ve turned their lives around. Driving each of these projects is a steadfast belief that content outweighs technique.

Top tip: be cheeky and a bit unreasonable in requests of others and of yourself

Meet the Image Nation speakers, part one

One of the must-attend events of New Zealand photography is coming up next month, and this year’s programme looks as dazzling as ever.

Image Nation is a two-day conference of back-to-back presentations by some of the biggest names in commercial photography, both local and international. This year it is taking place on Friday, June 13 and Saturday June 14 at central Auckland’s Q Theatre. The organiser, the Advertising and Illustrative Photographers Association, has done a wonderful job in keeping the price of admission down to make the event accessible: check out the tickets here.

To make sure you’re all clued up for this weekend of information overload, D-Photo introduces you to the prestigious speakers taking to the stage at this year’s Image Nation conference:

Simon Harsent

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Originally from England, photographer Simon Harsent emigrated to Australia and has spent over two decades developing his career to become one of the country’s most highly regarded commercial shooters. Working from bases in both Sydney and New York, he now counts BMW, Emirates, Sony, Singapore Airlines, Subaru, Canon, Mastercard, Levi’s, and Range Rover, Hyatt Hotels among his covetable list of clients.

His commercial work has brought him a slew of both national and international awards, including Cannes Lions, One Show, Clio, D&AD, London International, and Australia’s first Cannes Grand Prix. In 2011 he co-founded the New South Whales-based POOL photography collective.

As well as being one of the world’s most awarded commercial photographers, he has also cultivated a respected career in the fine art world. In 2009 he published his first monograph, Melt: Portrait of an Iceberg, which was exhibited in galleries and museums around the globe. He also has work in the permanent collections of the Queensland Art Gallery and The Powerhouse Museum.

Below you can watch a video of Harsent discussing his Melt project in the Canon Seconds video series.

 

Mark Watson

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Regarded as one of Australia’s leading adventure sport photographers, Mark Watson is undoubtedly a man with a few thrilling tales to tell. Motocross, heliskiing, free climbing, mountain biking, cliff diving, paragliding – if it’s the sort of thing that has the potential to scare someone half to death, you can bet he’s shot it.

Watson is a photographer who has turned his love of adventure into a thriving career, shooting for a wide variety of clients, from the usual suspects in the commercial, sports and auto industries to government agencies, editorial magazines and websites, and advertising campaigns.

He has also attracted sponsorship from a variety of big brands, including being a Nikon Australia Ambassador and Red Bull Australia’s key photographer. In the following video Watson discusses a motion and stills shoot he devised with a hang glider sailing through amazing clouds.

 

Liz Ham

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With a distinctive style comprising equal parts humours irreverence, storytelling aptitude, and a nostalgically charged visuals, Liz Ham has become one of Australia’s leading fashion photographers in a career just shy of two decades.

Ham’s work has been featured in the pages of Vogue Australia, Blackbook, Dazed and Confused, Nylon, InStyle, Madison, Russh, Oyster, GQ, Vogue Nippon and Manuscript. Her distinctive style has also been brought to bear on such celebrities as Emma Booth, Miranda Otto, Xavier Samuels, Jessica Mauboy, Sia and Jennifer Hawkins.

As well cultivating an inspiring fashion career, Ham also creates editorial and advertising work for the likes of Australian Ballet, Herringbone, Ksubi, Wrangler, Peter Alexander, and Telstra, and her creative personal work has been featured in the Sydney Museum of Contemporary Art and the Art Monthly journal.

 

Emma Bass

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Auckland photographer Emma Bass is well positioned to discuss both commercial and fine art photographic areas, with a prominent two-decade career to draw upon.

On the commercial side she shoots for a range of the country’s leading magazines, including Life & Leisure, Good, Taste, NZ House & Garden, Next, Fashion Quarterly, and many more. Specialising in both environments and portraiture, she has employed her bold and vibrant style to create images of some of New Zealand’s biggest celebrities, including Denise L’estrange Corbet, Lucy Lawless, Jonah Lomu, Keisha Castle-Hughs and Peter Jackson.

Her most recent fine art achievements include a second edition of her Imperfect series, comprising elegant still life images of flower arrangements in various states of decay. Some of these works can currently be seen at Auckland’s Black Asterisk gallery.

 

Christina Force
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Once the founder of both New Zealand’s first photographer’s agency and dedicated stills production company, Christina Force is a wealth of knowledge and experience perfectly tailored to New Zealand photography.

As well as being a key player in shaping the way local ad agencies deal with photographers, particularly in terms of production values and copyright issues, Force has also been instrumental in launching many local commercial photographers onto the international stage.

Since 2011 she has rededicated herself as a marketing and folio consultant for photographers, helping her clients craft folios to appeal to the specific markets they wish to launch into, including Asia and North America. Any photographer that has been on the receiving end of Force’s tuteladge will tell you the opportunity is not one to pass up.

 

Looking to crack the Asian Market?

Update: The venue has now been confirmed - Axis Building, Studio 3.3, 91 St Georges Bay Road, Parnell, Auckland.

Commercial photographers keen to take their business beyond New Zealand shores have an exciting opportunity to learn from one of the country’s top consultants in Auckland next week.

Folio and marketing consultant Christina Force is holding a full-day seminar titled Cracking the Asian Market on Tuesday, October 2, to help commercial photographers looking to secure work from the Asian market.

Force says New Zealand is a popular go-to destination for major brand shoots from Asia and local photographers are increasingly being recognised as being world-class and being asked on assignments overseas.

But she cautions that without an awareness of how to handle cultural differences and making sure expectations aren’t misinterpreted in translation photographers may miss out on many opportunities.

“If you don’t have experience working with Asian based clients you need to learn some basics before you risk making key mistakes.”

The seminar comprises two sections:

The morning a session, called Getting Your Work Noticed, will cover such subjects as advertising in Asia, the difference in ad agencies, how the buying and production system differs, what to include in a folio, preparing for a sales trip and best marketing approaches.

The afternoon session, Winning the Jobs, will address how to present work for a potential job, variations in wording, descriptions and lingo, basic etiquette, how to negotiate, being prepared for an estimate, deadlines, budgets and legalities and how to get paid.

The morning session runs from 9AM to 12.30PM, the afternoon session from 2AM to 5.30PM and will be held at an unconfirmed venue in Parnell, Auckland – pricing is as follows:

One session (includes tea/coffee): $225 +GST for AIPA Members, $275 +GST for Non-Members.

Both sessions (includes tea/coffee and lunch): $400 +GST for AIPA Members, $500 +GST for Non-Members.

To book a place email admin@aipa.org.nz with your name, contact details, your preferred payment method (cheque, Visa/Mastercard, or internet banking), and which session(s) you would like to attend.

For more information on Force’s experience in the Asian market check out this blog post, or head to the event’s Facebook page to stay up to date.

Image: Christina Force, by Alistair Guthrie

More Force workshops

Following a series of sold-out workshops last year, photography consultant Christina Force returns to the circuit to deliver more seminars on getting your photography business up to scratch in Auckland next month.

Force, the founder of New Zealand’s first folio consultancy practice, will be taking two workshops– one on sales and marketing, the other on quoting and negotiation – at central Auckland’s Studio Lumiere on March 12.

The sales and marketing workshop will run from 9am to 1pm covering the likes how to get into an ad or design agency, how to get the most out of promotional material and how to systemise your sales visits.

Every photographer attending the morning workshop will also guided through creating a personal annual marketing plan.

The evening session on quoting and negotiating will run from 2pm to 6pm, touching on such topics as asking the right questions, putting together an estimate, writing a cover letter, follow-up techniques and writing treatments.

The Advertising and Illustrative Photographers Association presents the workshops, admission to just one costs $225 for members and $275 for non-members or attend them both for $400 as a member or $500 for non-members, all excluding GST.

Places are limited so contact info@aipa.org.nz to reserve your spot.

Upcoming Christina Force workshops

Later this month you will have the chance to learn from one of the best in the industry when Christina Force hosts two business-focused seminars to help photographers sort out their commercial game plans.

Force, the founder of New Zealand’s first folio consultancy practice, will be taking two workshops– one on sales and marketing, the other on quoting and negotiation – on December 12 in central Auckland.

The sales and marketing workshop will run from 9am to 12:30pm covering the likes how to get into an ad or design agency, how to get the most out of promotional material and how to systemise your sales visits.

Every photographer attending the morning workshop will also guided through creating a personal 2012 marketing plan.

The evening session on quoting and negotiating will run from 2pm to 5.30pm, touching on such topics as asking the right questions, putting together an estimate, writing a cover letter, follow-up techniques and writing treatments.

The Advertising and Illustrative Photographers Association presents the workshops, admission to just one costs $225 for members and $275 for non-members or attend them both for $400 as a member or $500 for non-members.

The venue has yet to be confirmed, though will definitely be within central Auckland, register your interest by emailing info@aipa.org.nz.

Image: © Sara Orme