Checking in with Dunedin Photographic Society

As anyone who has travelled the region could not help but recognize, Otago is a centre of visual splendour and abundant photographic opportunities — be it breathtaking landscapes, rich natural history, or charming historic architecture. It’s no surprise, then, to learn the region is also home to one of the most well-established photographic societies in the southern hemisphere, the Dunedin Photographic Society.

David Steer, Boh Tea Plantation

The organization is the oldest continually running photo club in this part of the globe. With such an impressive history, the club has had ample time to evolve into the diverse assemblage of passionate photographers it comprises today, as John Casey, president of the society, explains.

Ross McIvor, Bellbird and Bee

“We have about 70 members, aged from 20s to 80s. The skill factor starts from internationally recognized photographers to relative beginners.”

Kate Burton, No Longer Needed

The organization boasts a strong programme of educational events, with a recent highlight being a highly successful workshop on photographing auroras. There’s also ample opportunity for members to enter images in various competitions, but Casey says the club does not emphasize one element over the other.

Mark Fox, Orange

“We try to balance the two. We hold a competition every meeting, but are very mindful of trying to pass on knowledge to our members. Four seasonal exhibitions are held each year, two print and two projected images.”

Melanie Middlemiss, Evening Rush

Looking to the club’s future, the president sees the recruitment and retention of younger members, in tandem with a strong balance of meetings, speakers, workshops, field trips and knowledge sharing as paramount to the venerable society’s continued success.

Craig McKenzie, Western Weka

This article was originally published in D-Photo Issue No. 62. Missed this copy? You can add a print copy or a digital copy of the magazine to your collection below: